Bespoke "Voss" Table Lamp

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"A beautiful catilever lamp featuring a "voss" water bottle."
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"A beautiful catilever lamp featuring a "voss" water bottle."
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"A beautiful catilever lamp featuring a "voss" water bottle."
Click To View Images
"A beautiful catilever lamp featuring a "voss" water bottle."
Click To View Images
"A beautiful catilever lamp featuring a "voss" water bottle."
Click To View Images
"A beautiful catilever lamp featuring a "voss" water bottle."
Click To View Images
"A beautiful catilever lamp featuring a "voss" water bottle."
Click To View Images
"A beautiful catilever lamp featuring a "voss" water bottle."
Click To View Images
"A beautiful catilever lamp featuring a "voss" water bottle."
Click To View Images
"A beautiful catilever lamp featuring a "voss" water bottle."
Click To View Images
"A beautiful catilever lamp featuring a "voss" water bottle."
Click To View Images
"A beautiful catilever lamp featuring a "voss" water bottle."
Click To View Images
"A beautiful catilever lamp featuring a "voss" water bottle."
Click To View Images
"A beautiful catilever lamp featuring a "voss" water bottle."
Click To View Images
"A beautiful catilever lamp featuring a "voss" water bottle."
Click To View Images
"A beautiful catilever lamp featuring a "voss" water bottle."

The Creative Journey

On 17th November 2016, I complete a Steampunk inspired lamp, this was the first lamp constructed, and a catalyst for what is today, a substantial portfolio of lamps.

In early December 2016, I stumbled across an interesting cog while looking through an antique and collectables store; Wombat In Thirroul located in Thirroul on the NSW South Coast, this set in motion creative thoughts for a second lamp.


Cutting of Glass Bottles

In late November / early December, I began to practice with cutting of glass bottles, in part to create some vases from the bottoms, however, this inspired some thoughts about featuring an interesting bottle in a lamp design.

One particular bottle of interest was that of the "Voss" Water Company, a Norwegian brand featuring an iconic tall cylindrical bottle.

I was somewhat successful at 'cutting' the bottle, however a great deal more work was needed to smooth the edge so that I would be suitable to be used as a feature for a lamp.

The process alone to finish the edge is very laborious as you need use wet and dry abrasive papers from 80 grit and step through all the way to 1200 grit or higher to achieve a very smooth edge.

There are a couple of process for 'cutting' a bottle, the best approach would be a diamond coated saw and then the ends fire-polished, however this is not withing my current reach of being able to do.

The next approach, by scoring the glass (as would when cutting glass), this introduces a fault-line where the glass will separate nicely.

However, when dealing with a glass bottle it that the glass is non-uniform, and therefore introduces another level of complexity.

Another simple approach takes advantage of thermal shock. Firstly, the glass is scored using a glass cutter that allows you to rotate the bottle.

By then Heating the scored bottle in boiling water and then introducing a thermal shock by way of a ice-cold water bath, eventually, if successful, the glass will part.

In my experience, its quite a hit and miss approach, many trials, found stress cracks tracking from the main score line, and also the process of alternating hot / cold water baths actually look a substantially long time (more that half an hour).


Lamp Design

A design featuring the Voss water bottle and using the cog as the stand had been conceptualised. Three key elements would be used as part of the lamp; Hardwood base to mount the cog and in-turn supporting the bottle. As the project progressed, the design became the most challenging to date. Questions raised; How to design the interface between the lamp holder / bottle and the cog stand and have it aesthetically balance?

An initial design was sketched for a cantilever design for the top. Initially, Copper tube was envisaged as part of the design, however, this idea would change.

Several design concepts were tested.


Cantilever Design

Eventually, wood was selected as an element for the top support for the lamp. Some of the challenges included:

  • Allowing for adjustment of the cantilever arms,

  • Adjustment of the lamp itself,

  • How to attach the cantilever arms to the main support.

Initial mounting to the main support was via a brass 'T' fitting, later this gave way to a wood pivot point. This initiated a refinement of the main support.

A Brass thread to copper capillary adapter was used to attach to the base structure (via internal brass all-tread tube). A small section of copper tube was braised on to the adapter (courtesy of Alcafe Engineering). The copper tube extension was drilled through to provide the supporting central mounting pivot for the cantilever arms. Finally, the top of the lamp completed with a cast iron knob as a finial.

The cantilever arm was made using two section of 300mm long Tasmanian Oak, the ends cut at 45° as an added aesthetic balance. Two further wood elements added at the ends of the arm, to make the support for the counter-weight and the actual holder for the lamp.


Counter-Weight

To balance out the weight of the lamp holder assembly, a required counter-weight was calculated based on the distances from the pivot point. A weight of around 620g was required.

On a visit back to Wombat in Thirroul, I had found an interesting old double-peen hammer head. A great addition was the rusted patina and texture, this has been preserved.

Later, weighing the hammer head, it came in at 605g, which fell within the ball-park needed. The complete weight assembly was attached via a single large bolt.


Lamp Assembly

A brass and wood assembly was constructed to hold the actual lamp holder / bottle. The wood element has a central hole to take a mounting bolt, and a hole bored to run the electrical cable through.

The brass bracket was constructed to wrap around the wood header and 8 brass screws used to secure the bracket. A central hole was drilled in the brass bracket which is then secured to the lamp holder via the cable retainer.

A total of 26 components make up the final lamp head assembly.


Added Details & Lamp Completion

Detailed features include; Lichtenberg figures etched into the wood using 15,000 Volts and finally, the signature of the artist.

The completed lamp wired with burgundy cloth-covered cable and in-line switch.

The lamp first lit on 4th January 2017.

Our next lamp, takes us on a more Organic Journey.


Postscript:
The writing of this page on our website takes place to the exact date, 4 years ago since this lamp was first lit.


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